Etiquette For Housewarming Gifts

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It is always exciting to move into a new house, whether it is your very first one or the tenth. Making it your own space and doing your own decorating is an achievement you will most likely want to share with family and friends. If you want to invite people over so they can see your new home, having a housewarming party allows you to open up your doors to everybody at the same time and have a celebration with them. Etiquette rules will help you with how gifts should be handled, whether you are the individual visiting someone else’s new home or you are the one with the new home.

 

Invitations and Gifts

Send invitations to your housewarming party two to three weeks ahead of time at h=least. Do not mention any gift registry information or gift, unless you want to state “No gifts, please.” There is one exception to this which is when a friend or somebody not living in the house is hosting the party. Then that individual can make recommendations or add a small statement about where the home resident is registered.

Invitations can be sent via email or mail. Include the time and date, in addition to the new address. Provide precise, clear directions along with a small map.

Hostess or Host Etiquette

It is becoming very common for individuals to register at places like Target, or Bed, Bath and Beyond for housewarming gifts. There is disagreement among etiquette experts on whether or not it is appropriate to register for housewarming gifts.

Do not ask for gifts or expect them. If a guest asks you before the party what you want or need or what colour scheme you have, it is fine to share this information, in addition to where you have registered, if you are going to take that approach.

Do not open your gifts during the party. That is considered to be rude and bad etiquette since some guests won’t bring gifts. If you open gifts this can make them feel awkward and self-conscious. A housewarming party’s purpose is for welcoming your family and friends into your house, not for you to solicit gifts.

Once you do open your gifts, make sure to track of who gave each gift. After the party is over, send sincere thank-you notes, and be genuinely appreciative, for each gift that you receive. Make sure to thank your family and friends for coming to your housewarming party.

Guest Etiquette

Take a gift. You can bring an elaborate gift, but it can also be inexpensive, simple, and small. Add your gift quietly in among the other gifts, or give it to the hostess discreetly. Don’t ever bring attention to yourself and the gift you are giving, since not all guests may bring one to the party. Keepsake gifts from Silver and Pewter Gifts are very popular to remind the hosts of their achievement for a long time to come.

It isn’t rude or uncommon to spend £10 to £20 or even more on your housewarming fit. Offer high-end liquor, a bottle of wine, drinks, food, candles, kitchen knives, a bar set, homemade cookies, a houseplant. If you are unsure of what you should get, then a gift card to a garden or home improvement store is appropriate. At least give a card of congratulations even when the invitation says “No gifts, please.”

So what types of items make really good hostess gifts or housewarming party presents?

  • Gift cards for home improvement stores, like Ace Hardware, Home Depot, or Lowes.
  • Personalized or monogrammed picture frames. If you know what your host’s interior paint colours and decorating tastes are you can get decorative frames.
  • A welcome mat, personalized or monogrammed glasses, or other household items.

Plants and flowers

  • A nice bottle of champagne or wine, as long as you know that your hosts drink champagne or wine. Also, note that a really cheap bottle of wine or booze isn’t an appropriate housewarming gift. If you are going to give a housewarming present of champagne or wine it should be worthy of the celebration.
  • Party table wares like specialty food serving sets (such as an ice cream sundae set or cheese board) or serving dishes. Unless you are aware of a specific decorating style of your hosts, you should only give tablewares or serving pieces in fairly neutral colours and designs, or that can be returned and enclose a gift receipt.